Canada business – SBS Internet Solutions http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 02:24:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Canada business – SBS Internet Solutions http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/ 32 32 Canada suspends admission of highly skilled immigrant workers due to heavy backlog http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/canada-suspends-admission-of-highly-skilled-immigrant-workers-due-to-heavy-backlog/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 22:07:30 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/canada-suspends-admission-of-highly-skilled-immigrant-workers-due-to-heavy-backlog/ Breadcrumb Links Canadian politics Despite a shortage of labor in some parts of the country, the federal government is suspending new invitations because it does not have the capacity to process them Publication date : January 21, 2022 • 3 hours ago • 5 minute read • 102 comments Canada’s express entry pool, which includes […]]]>

Despite a shortage of labor in some parts of the country, the federal government is suspending new invitations because it does not have the capacity to process them

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OTTAWA – Canada’s immigration system for highly skilled workers is seriously behind schedule and even in the midst of a labor shortage, the government is suspending new invitations because the department simply cannot process them fairly quickly, according to a briefing document.

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Immigration lawyer Steven Meurrens obtained the document through freedom of information and provided it to the National Post. In the memo, department officials point out that “approximately 76,000” applicants are in the federal highly skilled worker application inventory, which is more than the government needs to meet targets through 2023.

The same memo says the Express Entry pool, which includes skilled workers, skilled trades and people with Canadian life experience, is over 207,000.

Canada’s immigration plan has a variety of different categories, including skilled workers, provincial nominees, family reunification, and refugees. The government has continued to process provincial nominees, but other economic immigrants have stalled since last fall.

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People who apply under the Highly Skilled Workers and Trades Program submit a variety of documents, including a language test, and then wait for an invitation to complete their application before it is processed.

With travel bans in place, applications for highly skilled workers from overseas have been on pause since September 2021. Last year the government still managed to meet its record immigration targets, but did so mainly by inviting people already in Canada on temporary permits. or as students to become permanent residents under a new Temporary Resident to Permanent Resident (TR2PR) program.

The government’s current immigration plan calls for 110,500 skilled workers to arrive next year, but the department says in a memo that this may need to be cut in half because the department has so much other work.

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“These reductions are due to the intake space required to accommodate the TR2PR stream and the resettlement of Afghan nationals to Canada,” the memo reads.

The Liberals initially pledged to bring 20,000 Afghans to Canada, but during the fall campaign they doubled the pledge to 40,000. According to the latest update, 7,000 of them arrived in Canada.

A new ministerial immigration plan will be tabled in Parliament when the House of Commons resumes in February.

The department is aiming for a six-month processing time for Federal Skilled Workers (FSWs), but in the memo they warned that could increase significantly.

“Processing times are currently 20.4 months (over three times the service standard) and are expected to continue to increase as older inventory is processed. FSW processing time is expected to increase to 36 months throughout 2022.”

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Immigration Minister Sean Fraser was not available for an interview, but Rémi Larivière, spokesman for the department, said the government will still bring in highly skilled workers, as there are already plenty of them in the waiting line.

“The already existing strong inventory of qualified candidates to process means that there will be no reduction in 2022 in the number of new qualified permanent residents arriving in Canada to work and settle,” she said in a statement. e-mail. “This break is temporary; invitations to apply under the FHS streams will resume once the treatment inventory is reduced enough to create space for new admissions.

Larivière said the fall financial update included measures to help reduce the backlog.

“The Government of Canada has offered to provide $85 million in 2022-2023 to be able to process more applications for permanent and temporary residence and to reduce processing times in key areas affected by the pandemic.

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Conservative MP Jasraj Singh Hallan, the party’s immigration spokesman, said the delays were unacceptable.

“The massive backlog the Liberal government has created at Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada is not only hurting newcomers, families, immigrants and hard-working business owners, but it is also threatening billions of dollars in growth. economy that Canada so badly needs,” he said. in a report.

He said employers need workers and the government must act quickly.

“Immigrants and Canadian employers cannot wait three years for Federal Skilled Worker applications to be processed. It is time for the Liberals to announce a specific date for the end of the pause in processing federal skilled worker invitations.

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A study by the Business Development Bank of Canada last fall found that 55% of Canadian businesses were facing labor shortages. They found that this number increased to 80% in hotel-type businesses.

Prospective immigrants to Canada are scored on their level of education, language skills and other metrics as part of the government’s comprehensive ranking system. The memo says that with the current state of apps, someone would need a score above 500.

Betsy Kane, an immigration lawyer in Ottawa, said that was a very high score.

“What it’s going to mean is basically a young couple with a very high education for both the candidate and the person involved, potentially only with executive-type job offers,” she said. “What it tells you is that only powerful couples are going to benefit from scores over 500.”

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Kane said with this backlog, there will also be many people with work or study permits who will need extensions because their applications have not been processed.

The federal Liberals have set targets to bring in more than 400,000 immigrants a year. Kane said they needed more than lofty goals.

“The ministry has the ability to do that. He just needs tools.

She said that should include getting people back to the office to process applications, many of which arrive on paper.

“This department is an essential service just like the Canada Revenue Agency and just like the Canada Border Services Agency,” she said. “These guys should be back in the office.”

Sergio Karas, an immigration lawyer in Toronto, said the department also needs to start focusing more on the needs of Canadian employers.

“I don’t think it’s about adding staff. I think it’s about realigning priorities and reallocating staff to handle the kind of demands that the Canadian economy needs,” he said. “Employers are desperate for skilled trades for highly skilled people, typically in the construction industry.”

Twitter: Email: rtumilty@postmedia.com

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Sex workers, advocates at odds over getting escorts and body rub licenses http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/sex-workers-advocates-at-odds-over-getting-escorts-and-body-rub-licenses/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 02:55:00 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/sex-workers-advocates-at-odds-over-getting-escorts-and-body-rub-licenses/ Advocates for victims of human trafficking applaud a report presented to city council, while some sex workers warn it could cause harm. The motion presented to the Policy Executive Committee on Wednesday recommends the city repeal its licenses for adult-oriented businesses, including escort agencies and body massage practitioners. Currently, the city has 31 licenses with […]]]>

Advocates for victims of human trafficking applaud a report presented to city council, while some sex workers warn it could cause harm.

The motion presented to the Policy Executive Committee on Wednesday recommends the city repeal its licenses for adult-oriented businesses, including escort agencies and body massage practitioners.

Currently, the city has 31 licenses with different businesses, which bring in $23,058 per year. If city council adopted the report, Winnipeg would no longer get any license fee money.

“These companies are vehicles for horrific abuse of women and girls,” Joy Smith told the committee. The longtime advocate for victims of human trafficking called the report a “game changer”.

“It’s time to take a stand and say, here in Winnipeg, we will not allow our children to be victimized, bought and sold,” she said.

Sex workers concerned about language, effects of report

The report recommends repealing licenses – it does not detail business closures. But some who have chosen to work in the sex industry say it is a slippery slope to push sex workers into more dangerous situations.

“We’re just worried about the surveillance and our safety,” said a 30-year-old Winnipeg woman who is a sex worker and goes by the pseudonym Emma. She is a member of the Sex Workers of Winnipeg Action Coalition and spoke to CBC News after the meeting.

“Removing the licenses, if that means they’re finally trying to shut down a safe working environment, then that’s a really scary thing. I don’t know where it’s going to go, but we’ve seen it elsewhere. It doesn’t help anybody.”

Emma said she didn’t think enough sex workers were consulted for the report. Overall, however, she hopes councilors can tell the difference between those who choose to be sex workers and those who are exploited.

“Sex workers are consenting adults. You can only have sex work consensually. Otherwise it’s trafficking exploitation,” she said.

“These two things have to be very separate. We want to operate like ordinary businesses.”

Kate Sinclaire, an adult filmmaker from Winnipeg, asked the Policy Executive Committee to focus its policies on harm reduction for sex workers. (Provided by Kate Sinclaire)

Winnipeg adult filmmaker Kate Sinclaire echoes Emma’s concerns.

“The ban does not make sex work safer or make it go away,” she told the committee, adding that councilors must consider harm reduction for sex workers in their policies. .

Can’t separate the two, says longtime victims’ advocate

But the vote was a big win for Diane Redsky. The executive director of the Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Center said removing licenses from such businesses will help protect indigenous women and girls who are at greater risk of harm or exploitation.

“These places are places where they are sexually assaulted, sexually exploited and financially exploited,” Redsky told CBC after the meeting. “This is the true reality of what we see as a service provider that has been working on this issue for over 20 years now.”

She said you can’t separate sex work from exploitation if you really want to help those who are taken advantage of.

“Any form of legitimization of the sex industry will lead to increased sexual exploitation of vulnerable people,” she told CBC News after the meeting.

“It works on the same business principles of supply and demand. You have to have supply because the demand is there for sexually exploited women and girls. vulnerable who need to be victimized.”

“We really need to come together as citizens of the City of Winnipeg to say that women and girls are not for sale in the City of Winnipeg.”

The Policy Executive Committee unanimously approved four of the report’s five recommendations. The outlier was a recommendation to create a partnership between the National Human Trafficking Education Center and the taxi service industry.

Some advisers said it was too narrow and more could be done on that front. The committee voted 4 to 3 against this recommendation. The report goes to city council next week.

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Few signs of union resurgence, despite rising prices and labor shortages http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/few-signs-of-union-resurgence-despite-rising-prices-and-labor-shortages/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 09:00:00 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/few-signs-of-union-resurgence-despite-rising-prices-and-labor-shortages/ With inflation reducing the purchasing power of workers and businesses complaining of staff shortages, you might think the time has come for a dramatic resurgence of the type of work activity that Canada does not have. known since the 1970s. But, so far, people who study the labor movement in Canada say that is not […]]]>

With inflation reducing the purchasing power of workers and businesses complaining of staff shortages, you might think the time has come for a dramatic resurgence of the type of work activity that Canada does not have. known since the 1970s.

But, so far, people who study the labor movement in Canada say that is not happening.

examples of union activism in the United States — especially among warehouse workers at Amazon and the Starbucks coffee chain — have had only faint echoes in Canada.

Try to keep up with inflation

Instead, the data seems to show that the workers who follow inflation so far are those who take individual – rather than collective – action to fight for better wages and working conditions: they change jobs.

After the seven per cent rise in prices in the United States last week, Canadians get an official tally on Wednesday.

Although Statistics Canada calculates its consumer price index (CPI) differently here than in the United States, economists expect our prices to rise a little faster than the month’s 4.7% increase. last.

A study titled Talent Trends, published Friday by the Conference Board of Canada, shows that costly labor shortages reported by business groups may create an opportunity for those wishing to change jobs in search of better pay and conditions.

Union members are shown on strike in Denver last week, part of a growing wave of industrial action in the United States that experts say is not happening in Canada. Instead, they say, Canadians are quitting and looking for better jobs. (Kevin Mohatt/Reuters)

What the study shows is that “voluntary turnover” – not being fired or laid off – is trending upward, reaching a seven-year high of 9.1% in 2020-21.

One of the report’s authors, Lauren Florko, noted that turnover is particularly concentrated in three areas: high-tech jobs, healthcare and manufacturing. It’s not yet clear what drives people to leave manufacturing jobs, she said, but for the other two sectors, the reasons are quite distinct.

“Why we’re seeing it primarily for science and technology career fields is primarily because those are jobs that can work from home, and we see there’s a lot of potential poaching,” said Floriko.

And the demand for tech workers is high not only in Canada, she said, but also for Canadians employed remotely by global companies.

Burnout

In healthcare, it’s more about workers driven out by burnout during the intense demands of the pandemic, Florko said. Some change careers, others seek more education.

While wages continue to lag inflation, higher turnover contributes to better wages, simply because new jobs tend to pay more than the ones people leave.

In the case of relatively low-paid workers, the Conference Board study shows that extended wage rates in new job postings in 2020 increased by 5.7%, well above the rate of inflation.

People who didn’t change jobs didn’t get the same kind of raises, Florko said.

WATCH | Longer COVID-related hospital stays leading to burnout for caregivers:

CIHI report highlights cost of COVID-19 to healthcare workers, expert says.

A report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information that details the high monetary cost of caring for patients with COVID-19 also underscores how the complex care required is draining healthcare workers, says Dr Matthew Oughton, infectious disease specialist in Montreal. (Evan Mitsui/CBC) 1:14

Stephanie Ross, co-author of the book Rethinking Labor Policy in Canada, was surprised that after a long period of stagnation in areas such as strike rates and the creation of new locals, there has not been more union resurgence to improve wages and conditions.

“There are always groups of workers trying to unionize, but those attempts haven’t really moved the needle,” said Ross, who was recently named director of the School of Labor Studies at McMaster University in Hamilton.

According to the Canadian Labor Congress, the largest labor demonstration in Canadian history took place in 1976, when more than a million workers have stopped working as part of a protest against wage and price controls imposed by a federal government trying to tackle soaring inflation.

The lagging workers

Since that time, workers have earned a diminishing share of productivity gains.

A study by US firm Pew Research showed that labor’s share of income had not budged in 40 years, while returns to capital soared. The Canadian figures are similar.

Some analysts blame the change on lower levels of unionization. Others attribute the decline, at least in part, to the ability of manufacturers to ship jobs overseas as part of globalization.

“I think there’s a lot of dissatisfaction with what’s going on in people’s workplaces and that usually leads to industrial action,” Ross said.

But that doesn’t seem to be happening in Canada, she said, especially compared to the United States and other parts of the world.

Why discontent — and a seemingly strong bargaining position for in-demand workers — doesn’t translate into collective labor action isn’t well understood, Ross said. This may be because unions have failed to meet these demands in the face of government-imposed limits on wage increases.

Or maybe, Ross said, it’s because, as a group, workers feel compelled to stay on the job during a crisis when they’re so badly needed.

Despite the anger of workers at a Cargill meat processing plant in High River, Alta., a strike was averted last month. The facility had been the site of one of the largest COVID-19 outbreaks in Canada. (Dan McGarvey/CBC)

Instead, individual workers demonstrate their bargaining power by quitting and taking another job, she said.

“This ability to quit reflects greater leverage, but it’s a very individual strategy.”

Economists suggest that the process of people leaving and finding better jobs is good for the economy because it tends to move labor to where workers’ skills are most needed, thus increasing the productivity of the economy.

Waiting for the “great attrition”

What is happening in health care is unclear, at least not yet.

But examples of past protests show they don’t always immediately follow periods of public discontent, said Lesley Wood, an associate professor at York University in Toronto.

“There may be a lag,” said Wood, who is studying something called “conflict cycles“, the sometimes mysterious process where peasant revolts are preceded by long periods of calm or wars after a long period of peace.

If inflation remains elevated and workers continue to lag behind, there is a possibility of another round of collective action, even if there are few signs at this time.

But whether workers decide to act — whether through unions or individual action — Florko said his research shows the bargaining power that currently gives them the confidence to quit isn’t likely to go away anytime soon. .

Despite increased turnover and Canada’s current shortage of skilled workers, what Florko’s report calls “great attrition” is only going to get worse. She said older workers with valuable skills who delayed their retirement during the pandemic are expected to exit the workforce in greater numbers over the next decade.

“Typically, we’re seeing retirements closer to 2 or 3% year over year — and last year we only saw 1.4,” Florko said.


Follow Don on Twitter @don_pittis

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HVAC scams and how to stop them; Why can’t retail workers get N95 masks? CBC Marketplace Cheat Sheet http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/hvac-scams-and-how-to-stop-them-why-cant-retail-workers-get-n95-masks-cbc-marketplace-cheat-sheet/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 14:55:39 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/hvac-scams-and-how-to-stop-them-why-cant-retail-workers-get-n95-masks-cbc-marketplace-cheat-sheet/ Missing something this week? Do not panic. Radio Canada Marlet brings together the consumer and health news you need. Want this in your inbox? Get the Marlet newsletter every Friday. Sellers use sketchy tactics to sell HVAC contracts. We caught one in the act This week, Marlet and Go in public team up to expose […]]]>

Missing something this week? Do not panic. Radio Canada Marlet brings together the consumer and health news you need.

Want this in your inbox? Get the Marlet newsletter every Friday.

Sellers use sketchy tactics to sell HVAC contracts. We caught one in the act

This week, Marlet and Go in public team up to expose the tactics used to entice consumers into overpriced long-term leases for new heating and cooling equipment — and more.

Our team set up a test house with hidden cameras to find out what would happen when a sales representative from a company with a history of complaints came to inspect the hot water tank.

The seasoned HVAC expert we asked to inspect the tank before Ontario Green Savings arrived found no faults. But when Axel Hermosa – a commissioned sales manager for the company – knocked on the door, we heard a very different story.

“You need to have it replaced within the next six days,” he said, explaining that once the tank is 10 years old, insurance will no longer cover damage. “So if anything happens, I’m responsible. I saw the tank…Insurance won’t cover that shit.”

But when we checked the specific insurance policy at the house, as well as with several other insurance companies and the Insurance Bureau of Canada, all said they covered damage from tanks over 10 years.

Hermosa also said the new tank would cost about $50 more per month than the current contract, but would be so efficient that it would save money in the long run. Many consumers who have shared their experience with CBC have never seen these savings. Read more

This is just one of the clever sales tactics you’ll need to watch out for. To see more, watch Market of full investigation.

Hidden cameras catch CVC scam in action

Exposing deceptive sales tactics used to lure people into unfair and overpriced HVAC contracts. And insiders are revealing the new ways they’re getting you to sign up for other home gear, too. 22:30

Marketplace Update: Instacart Edition

After last week Marlet investigation revealed hidden fees and markups for certain grocery items on Instacart from Loblaws and Costco, we heard from many viewers telling us about their own experiences with online grocery delivery.

But that wasn’t the only reaction to our story.

Following our investigation, the NDP sent a letter to the Competition Bureau ask the commissioner to investigate the cost of third-party grocery delivery apps like Instacart.

“With the speed at which the new variant of COVID-19 is spreading, more Canadians than ever before are self-isolating and forced to rely on grocery delivery services like Instacart,” the federal spokesperson said. NDP for Industry and MP Brian Masse in a statement.

“Canadians who are doing the right thing by staying home to keep their communities safe should not be punished by third-party apps that take advantage of the situation.”

The party also sent a letter to the chair of the industry committee asking that the committee meet again to discuss markups by third-party apps, among other agenda items.

We’ll keep you posted on any updates on this story, and in the meantime, resume our full Instacart investigation below.

Delivery offer or real scam?

Investigate hidden markups and missed sales on Instacart, as well as test HelloFresh, Chefs Plate and Goodfood. 22:30

Many frontline healthcare workers are being issued N95-type masks. Why not those who work in retail?

In the wake of Omicron, many regulations were changed quickly to better protect workers.

For example, most frontline healthcare workers in Ontario are now required to wear N95-type masks, which filter out the vast majority of dangerous coronavirus particles.

But for people who work with the general public, some of these changes are lagging behind.

In most grocery stores, there is still no mandate for the widespread use of N95 or equivalent masks, despite mounting evidence that cloth masks and other inferior options don’t do much. -something to slow the spread of the wildfire that is Omicron. Read more

Many grocery stores still rely on disposable masks for their employees, which experts say aren’t as effective as N95-type masks in limiting coronavirus transmission. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC)

Thousands of alleged breast implant injuries revealed in manufacturer data dump, CBC analysis finds

Health Canada has been left in the dark for years about thousands of alleged injuries and complications related to breast implants — including multiple mentions of a rare cancer — that manufacturers failed to report.

An analysis of CBC data found that more than half of the 5,990 new reports are suspected injuries, while the rest are classified as having the potential for injury or death if they recur, also known as near-misses .

The data suggests that manufacturers received reports as early as 2000, but they weren’t submitted to Health Canada’s database until nearly two decades later.

The organization launched an investigation after reviewing breast implant maker Allergan’s 2017 annual report, which mentioned breast implant incidents that did not appear in Health Canada’s database.

When asked by CBC News to provide more context on this under-reporting and Health Canada’s inspection, Allergan declined to comment. Read more

In 2018, a Marlet hidden camera investigation revealed how some plastic surgeons gloss over the health risks of breast implants during their sales pitches.

Terri McGregor was diagnosed in 2015 with breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL), a rare cancer associated with textured breast implants. CBC News found his doctor’s report to the manufacturer in a 2019 data dump. (Osama Farag/CBC News)

What else is going on?

China and the Philippines suspend beef imports from Canada after a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy
The disruption had no noticeable impact on Canadian prices, says the executive vice-president of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association.

Are owners responsible for slips on icy sidewalks?
The classic Canadian legal conundrum relates to the question of what it means to be a good neighbour.

Dewalt Jobsite Pro wireless headphones recalled due to burn and fire hazard
Immediately stop using the recalled DEWALT ® Jobsite Pro Wireless Headphones.

Certain Dole and President’s Choice brand salads recalled due to presence of listeria
Click to view the list of recalled products.

The marketplace needs your help

Did your batteries leak or stop working before you expected? We want to hear from you! Send us your photos and tell us more at marketplace@cbc.ca.

Watch this week’s episode of Marlet and catch up on past episodes anytime on CBC Gem.

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Staff absenteeism is a challenge for businesses, but preferable to total lockdown: Retail Council of Canada http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/staff-absenteeism-is-a-challenge-for-businesses-but-preferable-to-total-lockdown-retail-council-of-canada/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 23:51:03 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/staff-absenteeism-is-a-challenge-for-businesses-but-preferable-to-total-lockdown-retail-council-of-canada/ The Retail Council of Canada says staff absenteeism due to increased cases of Omicron variants is a challenge for businesses, but is preferable to a full lockdown which would be “harmful”. According to the Retail Council of Canada, up to 20% of the workforce across the country is absent, either in isolation awaiting COVID-19 test […]]]>

The Retail Council of Canada says staff absenteeism due to increased cases of Omicron variants is a challenge for businesses, but is preferable to a full lockdown which would be “harmful”.

According to the Retail Council of Canada, up to 20% of the workforce across the country is absent, either in isolation awaiting COVID-19 test results or due to a case virus confirmed.

“Without a doubt, each wave of this pandemic has posed a series of challenges for retailers, but due to the high transmissibility of the Omicron variant, we are seeing very significant absenteeism,” said John Graham, director of government relations for the RetailCouncil. of the Prairie region of Canada.

“However, when a fifth of your staff are away, it is very difficult, at the best of times, to operate a store.”

Graham said some small businesses – those with a small group of employees or that are family run – are being forced to close due to lack of staff.

He said coping with these staff shortages can mean under-serving customers, but it’s still a better option than a full lockdown.

“The concept of a hard shutdown, as in previous waves, has been detrimental to many businesses. Closing a business completely in a number of cases would mean permanent closures,” Graham said, adding absenteeism due to the self-isolation. is the best strategy to reduce cases of Omicron in the community.

“However, the most important thing at this time is to maintain strict sickness policies, to protect the workplace for both employees and shoppers, and to maintain mandatory masking and physical distancing and all these precautions that will create a safe environment.”

Currently in Manitoba, physical distancing measures and masks are mandatory in stores.

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High gas prices, labor shortages in oil fields, pipeline friction: the year ahead in energy http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/high-gas-prices-labor-shortages-in-oil-fields-pipeline-friction-the-year-ahead-in-energy/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 09:00:00 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/high-gas-prices-labor-shortages-in-oil-fields-pipeline-friction-the-year-ahead-in-energy/ The past two years have sent energy markets into a wild ride, with oil prices plunging underground at the start of the pandemic and soaring to over US $ 85 a barrel last fall. Alberta drillers and service companies have spoken of the risk of labor shortages, not layoffs. More activity in Canada’s oil field […]]]>

The past two years have sent energy markets into a wild ride, with oil prices plunging underground at the start of the pandemic and soaring to over US $ 85 a barrel last fall.

Alberta drillers and service companies have spoken of the risk of labor shortages, not layoffs. More activity in Canada’s oil field is expected in the coming year.

But energy discussions these days are rooted in two worlds – today’s demands and the transition ahead – as decarbonization efforts are even more focused with climate change.

These are some of the stories to watch out for in Energy in the coming months.

High gasoline prices

Motorists saw prices at the pump skyrocket last year. that of Statistics Canada latest inflation report found that gasoline prices rose 43 percent during the year through November.

Fuel prices have jumped as demand and economic activity began to return from the pandemic lows that had boosted decline in oil production around the globe.

The benchmark North American oil price soared well above US $ 75 per barrel last week. The average retail price of gasoline in Canada has climbed to over $ 1.48 per liter, according to Natural Resources Canada.

Motorists may not have much respite for several months.

Canadians might not get significant relief at the pumps until the end of the year, according to GasBuddy analyst Patrick De Haan. (Kevin Yarr / CBC)

Patrick De Haan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, expects gasoline prices to start rising again in March after seasonal declines in January and February. He said prices in 2022 could exceed figures from last year.

“I expect the high prices to lead to additional production,” he said. “But we’re going to have to wait until the final rounds of 2022 to really start to see significant relief.”

A busier oil field

Oil prices are expected to recover government revenue and drilling activity, although some industry officials have recently been find all workers they need.

The Canadian Association of Energy Contractors said in November that it plans to drill 6,457 oil and gas wells this year, an increase of more than 25% from 2021.

Natural gas should also continue to make the news as the impact of higher prices spills over to all savings, leading to higher heating and energy costs for consumers.

But these energy prices have, like ATB Financial rated, has been a “much needed balm” for the Alberta economy and has helped oil and gas producers rebuild their balance sheets, thanks to some strong cash flow.

The reclamation of old oil and gas wells, like the work done here in Alberta in 2019, is keeping workers busy at the oilfield as well. Skilled workers are expected to be in high demand in 2022. (Kyle Bakx / CBC)

“It is certain that new life has been given to the industry, both in terms of oil exploitation and [natural] gas, ”said Morgan Kwan, a Calgary-based senior vice president on the energy intelligence and analytics team of Enverus, a global energy data analytics company.

the Omicron variant of the coronavirus adds uncertainty to the outlook, but the OPEC oil cartel recently reported that he doesn’t expect the variant to hammer demand as hard as previously feared.

Pipeline conflict

Last year started with the White House interrupting the completion of the Keystone XL pipeline, with Calgary-based company TC Energy now pursuit of a $ 15 billion commercial claim.

No more cross-border disputes is probably above line 5, which transports approximately 87 million liters of crude oil and natural gas liquids per day between Superior, Wisconsin, and Sarnia, Ont., passing through northern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer wants to see it closed, concerned about the risk of a leak. Last fall Ottawa invoked a dispute resolution process contained in a 1977 pipeline treaty with the United States in support of its operation, citing its “importance to Canada’s economic and energy security”.

National pipelines also continue to be a source of optimism and scrutiny for the oil industry.

Self-identified land defenders display a version of a Mohawk unit flag in Wet’suwet’en traditional territory on December 19, 2021, after returning to block an area where Coastal GasLink is drilling a pipeline route under the Morice River in British Columbia (Submitted by Arvin Singh)

The Coastal GasLink project, which would transport natural gas to the coast of British Columbia for export, continued to attract protesters after high profile arrests in Wet’suwet’land last fall.

Coastal GasLink signed agreements with 20 elected band councils along the pipeline route, including in Wet’suwet’en territory, but failed to gain approval from the majority of hereditary chiefs.

Work continues on the contentious Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project from Alberta to British Columbia. The federally-owned project is expected to be online by early 2023. Operation of the existing line was temporarily halted during unprecedented flooding in British Columbia last year.

Climate monitoring

Oil companies and politicians made big promises last year on how they intend to reduce carbon emissions in the face of intensification of climate change.

Now people are waiting for the rest. Investor scrutiny – and cession – are part of a market which increasingly weighs on climate change and climate risk.

Several oil sands producers pledged last year to achieve zero net emissions by 2050.

These plans are based on the promise to carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS). They also include a big request from the government – something strongly opposed by groups such as Environmental Defense Canada.

At the federal level, the Liberal government is expected to unveil details of its plans for the Canadian Net Emissions Liability Act, which was adopted in June.

Warren Mabee, director of the Queen’s Institute for Energy and Environmental Policy in Kingston, Ont., Expects the plan to show how a country dependent on fossil fuels will start to move towards net zero.

“Many of us have been thinking about it for years, but this is the first time that we will see the government start to develop this plan,” said Mabee, who awaits the news in March.

“How much renewable energy does the government plan to integrate?” What is the role of things like carbon capture and sequestration? What is the role of hydrogen? “

Mabee said he is also monitoring developments in technology to help with the energy transition, such as geothermal power and battery storage improvements.

“These are really interesting things that could totally change the landscape,” he said.

Delegates speak at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow on November 13, 2021. (Yves Herman / Reuters)

Energy transition and disruption

International climate talks in Glasgow last fall again stressed the need for a transition to renewable energy sources, and while there has been global progress in growing renewables in 2021, experts say it’s clear such goals will require more work – and soon.

The international energy agency reported last month that renewable energy capacity additions were set to set another annual record in 2021. But he also said the current pace is not enough to put the world on track to net zero emissions from by 2050.

Adding to the discussion is the idea that even with decarbonization pledges, as one analyst said, it’s pretty clear that the world isn’t content with energy scarcity either. Thermal coal, for example, recorded record prices in some markets in October amid supply and electricity shortages.

“There’s a little energy crisis, and we’ve seen it all skyrocket,” Nick Volkmer, vice president of Enverus, said in an interview last month.

US President Joe Biden’s ambitious renewable energy plans, contained in his $ 1.75 billion Build Back Better spending program, face an uncertain future. (Alex Wong / Getty Images)

People will also be watching developments in the United States, as some of President Joe Biden’s ambitious renewable energy plans facing an uncertain political future.

“President Biden met some headwinds on its Build Back Better spending program, which included a lot of… projects related to renewable energy, incentives for electric vehicles, things like that, ”Mabee said.

The situation raised questions on how the White House will achieve its international climate promises and underlined the political complexity of the energy transition in the world’s largest economy.

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Arizona auto aspirations make unlikely ally in fight against electric vehicle tax credit in Canada http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/arizona-auto-aspirations-make-unlikely-ally-in-fight-against-electric-vehicle-tax-credit-in-canada/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 12:12:25 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/arizona-auto-aspirations-make-unlikely-ally-in-fight-against-electric-vehicle-tax-credit-in-canada/ WASHINGTON – From its arid desert climate to its mercurial center-right politics, the southern border state of Arizona seems to have little in common with Canada beyond the wary snowbirds in the winter. But President Joe Biden’s controversial plan to use protectionist tax incentives to promote US-made electric vehicles, which threatens the misery of the […]]]>

WASHINGTON – From its arid desert climate to its mercurial center-right politics, the southern border state of Arizona seems to have little in common with Canada beyond the wary snowbirds in the winter.

But President Joe Biden’s controversial plan to use protectionist tax incentives to promote US-made electric vehicles, which threatens the misery of the Canadian auto industry, creates all kinds of strange bedfellows.

With its proximity to both Silicon Valley and the US-Mexico border, without the high taxes and regulations of neighboring California, Grand Canyon State is working to accommodate the impending electric vehicle revolution – a vision set endangered by Biden’s project.

“We’re going to be one of the next hubs in the United States for manufacturing next-generation electric vehicles,” said Chris Camacho, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.

“We just want, from a federal policy perspective, a fair and balanced approach so that consumers can buy the products they want. Whether they are produced in states like Arizona or other states across the country, we believe that a prudent policy to encourage consumers to behave must be conducted in a fair manner. “

Arizona is far from the only state opposed to the measure, which, if passed, would allow potential buyers of electric vehicles to benefit from tax credits worth up to $ 12,500 provided whether their favorite car or truck is assembled in the United States and built with unionized workers.

But few have been more vocal critics. Last month, Phoenix Chamber of Commerce CEO Todd Sanders and Jaime Molera, Arizona director of a conservative environmental group called The Western Way, wrote an opinion piece denouncing a “poorly worded” program that “Would hamper” the state’s ambitions for electric vehicles.

Sanders, for his part, takes little comfort that Biden’s Build Back Better Bill, the $ 1.75 trillion social and climate spending program that contains the tax credits, suffered a setback before Christmas. when renegade Democratic Senator Joe Manchin said he wouldn’t. support it.

“What you learn early on is that nothing is ever dead,” Sanders, himself a veteran of public policy debates in government at the state legislature level, said in an interview. .

“If we can get Canada involved in this, obviously our friends in Mexico, and then our delegation to Congress, it is at least starting to raise concerns that this is not necessarily the right way to go. “

In addition to promising EV players like Rivian, Nikola and ElectraMecchanica, Arizona is also attracting suppliers of parts and manufacturing services, including Jomi Engineering Group, based in Barrie, Ont., Which will have approximately 120 employees by mid -year. its new facility at Casa Grande, just south of Phoenix.

“You can’t fight it,” Jomi founder and president Michael Hoy said of the electric vehicle industry’s growing gravitational pull to the southern United States.

“(We) could no longer build the Canadian operation; we probably would never have had the opportunity like we do, or become competitive enough, if we didn’t get closer to our customers.

In October, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey was among 11 Republican state governors who wrote to congressional leaders denouncing Biden’s plan as an unfair use of taxpayer money.

“We cannot support any proposal that creates a discriminatory environment in our states by punishing auto workers and automakers because workers in their factories have chosen not to unionize,” the letter said.

“Congress should not pass proposals that favor vehicles produced by one workforce over another, especially when doing so significantly limits consumer choice and undermines broader carbon reduction targets. ”

In the 50-50 Senate, West Virginia Manchin was the subject of speculation about his support for Build Back Better. Less attention has been paid to an equally unpredictable Democratic colleague, Senator Krysten Sinema, whose moderate-conservative politics aptly sums up the purple state she represents: Arizona.

As a right-to-work state – by law, potential employees cannot be compelled to join a union – with a vested interest in a robust and growing EV industry, Arizona is uniquely focused on eliminating the $ 4,500 portion of tax credits that focus on vehicles assembled in the United States and built by unions.

“That should make him almost the optimal ally,” said Roy Norton, a former senior diplomat who spent two stays at the Canadian Embassy in the 1990s and 2000s before becoming a diplomat in residence at the Balsillie School of International. Affairs in Waterloo, Ontario. .

“We don’t want to kill the subsidies. We just want to kill subsidies for vehicles made in the USA exclusively, and Arizona should be on exactly the same wavelength as it is a right to work state that is at odds with a president. and a bit of a backward administration. “

Officials in Ottawa confirm that the Arizona congressional delegation, and Sinema’s office in particular, continue to be at the center of the federal government’s lobbying efforts, which culminated late last year with the visits to Washington by several emissaries, including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Biden, however, does not hide his affinity for unionized workers, nor his ultimate goal of restoring the former luster of the once powerful American manufacturing sector. Both, along with reducing carbon emissions, are the main goals of a tax credit program that the White House says is close to its heart.

While he didn’t specifically mention the electric vehicle tax credits, Biden himself strongly signaled on Friday that he had not abandoned the Build Back Better bill, which is expected to come back to the fore. in the weeks or months to come.

Whether it will continue to include tax credits or whether the VE’s vision emerges in a different form remains an open question.

Responding to the latest US jobs report, the president on Friday reiterated his vision of a resurgent US manufacturing sector, fueled by an economy growing “from the bottom up and through the middle.”

“From day one, my economic agenda has been different. It’s about taking a fundamentally new approach to our economy – one that sees prosperity for working families as the solution, not the problem, ”he said.

“Let’s do what we sell in America made in America, so we don’t risk foreign supply chains and shipping delays.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on January 9, 2022.


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British Columbia officials announce return to classroom learning, order companies to reactivate COVID security plans http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/british-columbia-officials-announce-return-to-classroom-learning-order-companies-to-reactivate-covid-security-plans/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 21:35:16 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/british-columbia-officials-announce-return-to-classroom-learning-order-companies-to-reactivate-covid-security-plans/ The B.C. government said thousands of students across the province will resume classroom learning on Monday despite the risk that Omicron’s highly transmissible variant could have a significant impact on staffing in the weeks to come. to come. Education Minister Jennifer Whiteside joined Health Minister Adrian Dix and Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry in […]]]>

The B.C. government said thousands of students across the province will resume classroom learning on Monday despite the risk that Omicron’s highly transmissible variant could have a significant impact on staffing in the weeks to come. to come.

Education Minister Jennifer Whiteside joined Health Minister Adrian Dix and Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry in making the announcement in a live press conference on Friday.

Whiteside said stronger security measures will be put in place at schools, including staggered breaks, virtual assemblies and visitor restrictions. She also said schools will have access to three-layer masks, despite calls from the BC Teachers Federation to distribute in place of the N95s.

“It is essential, and a priority for all of us, that we keep schools open,” said Henry. Outside of the education system, she also announced that she is ordering business owners in British Columbia to reactivate COVID-19 security plans.

Last week, the province announced a phased return to school in January due to the spread of Omicron, and school administrators have used that time to prepare contingency plans, including functional and phased shutdowns when too many staff are sick or have to self-isolate.

On January 5, Teri Mooring, president of the BC Teachers Federation, said the union was greatly concerned that Omicron would cut staffing levels, so classrooms might not be able to function.

Rapid tests don’t come quickly

The province has also been criticized for the lack of rapid tests available in British Columbia

Health officials have faced calls during the pandemic, and more acutely over the past week as Omicron spreads rapidly, to widely disseminate the tests, which can be used at home and deliver results in minutes.

With children due to return to school next week, better availability of these tests would be welcomed by educators and families.

Henry said on Friday that a federal government supply was on its way and is expected to arrive next week.

She said all rapid tests in the province are currently recommended and are used in long-term care for healthcare workers and remote Indigenous communities.

When the new batch arrives from Ottawa, Henry said tests will be available to test symptomatic school staff at the end of next week and possibly will be available to help families test children at home.

Whiteside said schools will no longer report individual cases of COVID-19 to public health for contact tracing. Schools alert health authorities if overall attendance drops significantly, which will trigger a public health investigation, she said.

Henry said there is no hard and fast threshold for truancy because what’s normal will vary by school and district. She said parents will always be notified when a COVID-19 outbreak is identified.

Omicron threatening

The province announced on Thursday that 324 people are now hospitalized with COVID-19, including 90 in intensive care, as the province reported three more deaths from the disease.

24.2% of COVID-19 tests in British Columbia came back positive as of Thursday, according to the province’s COVID-19 dashboard.

Henry said anything above a five percent test positivity rate indicates a worrying level of community transmission.

A total of 3,223 new cases have also been reported. But following the rapid spread of the highly transmissible variant of Omicron, which has caused problems with testing capacity in British Columbia – and in light of the variant’s diminished virulence for many who contract it – Experts say the number of daily cases is now less reliable. statistics to understand the pandemic.



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Flight attendants say Sunwing’s party flight shows what industry is facing amid Omicron http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/flight-attendants-say-sunwings-party-flight-shows-what-industry-is-facing-amid-omicron/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 18:40:08 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/flight-attendants-say-sunwings-party-flight-shows-what-industry-is-facing-amid-omicron/ Following a party on a Sunwing Airlines flight from Montreal to Cancun, Mexico, flight attendants are calling for tougher government and carrier measures to ensure onboard health and safety amid the wave of Omicron. Videos from the December 30 flight shared on social media appear to show passengers wearing no masks as they congregate nearby, […]]]>

Following a party on a Sunwing Airlines flight from Montreal to Cancun, Mexico, flight attendants are calling for tougher government and carrier measures to ensure onboard health and safety amid the wave of Omicron.

Videos from the December 30 flight shared on social media appear to show passengers wearing no masks as they congregate nearby, singing and dancing in the aisle and on the seats.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau weighed in on Wednesday, saying he was “extremely frustrated” by the actions of travelers, some of whom appear to be Quebec social media influencers.

“It is a slap in the face to see people put themselves down, put their fellow citizens, endanger airline workers by being completely irresponsible,” he said at a press conference in Ottawa.

“I can assure you that this is a situation that Transport Canada takes very seriously and that we are definitely monitoring this situation.

Wesley Lesosky, president of the airlines division of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), which represents some 15,000 employees, said governments should work to speed up access to booster injections for crews and that airlines should cut aisle service to limit the flights caregivers’ exposure to the virus.

Rena Kisfalvi, who heads the local union representing about 1,000 Sunwing flight attendants, says Sunwing is the only major Canadian airline that does not offer rapid tests for cabin crew, a measure she says should be obligatory.

Half have made themselves sick since December

Up to 50% of his colleagues have had to become ill in the past month due to potential symptoms of COVID-19, Kisfalvi said.

Transport Minister Omar Alghabra and three other cabinet members said in a statement Tuesday that officials will open an investigation into the Sunwing incident and that failure to comply with the regulations can result in fines of up to 5,000. $.

Sunwing said its security service investigated the Dec. 30 trip and the company reported it to Transport Canada.

“The health and safety of our employees and passengers is our top priority at Sunwing Airlines,” the company said in an email.

Kisfalvi called the behavior of the passengers “unacceptable” and expressed his sympathy for the crew of the Cancun flight.

“There comes a time when if you lose control you can’t get it back sometimes,” she said in a telephone interview on Tuesday.

Compliance with mask rules has been a “massive problem” over the past year that has “caused a tremendous amount of aggressive behavior” from passengers towards cabin crew, she said.

“I don’t know where Transport Canada is on this. Why haven’t you done more? Kisfalvi asked, around the same time Alghabra post a message on twitter saying he asked Transport Canada to investigate the Sunwing affair.



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Trump and his children subpoenaed by New York attorney general in family business investigation http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/trump-and-his-children-subpoenaed-by-new-york-attorney-general-in-family-business-investigation/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:05:14 +0000 http://www.sbs-internetsolutions.com/trump-and-his-children-subpoenaed-by-new-york-attorney-general-in-family-business-investigation/ The New York attorney general recently subpoenaed former US President Donald Trump and his two eldest children, demanding their testimony in an ongoing civil investigation into the family’s business practices, a court record has found. public Monday. The subpoenas, arising from Attorney General Letitia James’ multi-year investigation into issues such as “valuation of property owned […]]]>

The New York attorney general recently subpoenaed former US President Donald Trump and his two eldest children, demanding their testimony in an ongoing civil investigation into the family’s business practices, a court record has found. public Monday.

The subpoenas, arising from Attorney General Letitia James’ multi-year investigation into issues such as “valuation of property owned or controlled” by Trump and his company, the Trump Organization, came to light after James was went to court last month in an attempt to force the Assets to comply.

A state court judge who has dealt with past disputes arising from the investigation agreed on Monday to hear the subpoena arguments, which are also asking the Trumps for documents in addition to their testimony.

James, a Democrat, has spent more than two years investigating whether the Trump Organization has misled banks or tax officials about the value of assets – inflating them to get favorable loan terms or downplaying them to achieve tax savings.

The Trumps have indicated they will fight the subpoenas and have to file court documents through their lawyers to have them deported. A similar legal battle unfolded last year after James’ office cited the testimony of another Trump son, Eric Trump.

Messages requesting comment were left at James ‘office and the Trumps’ attorneys.

Monday’s filing was also the first public disclosure that investigators were seeking information from Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump Jr. in connection with the investigation.

It was reported last month that James had asked Donald Trump to sit for a deposition, but Monday’s court record was the first public acknowledgment by his office that he had subpoenaed him to appear.

The legal battle intensifies

As the legal battle over subpoenas escalated behind the scenes, Trump sued James in federal court last month, seeking to end his investigation. Trump, in the lawsuit, claimed James violated his constitutional rights in a “thinly veiled effort to publicly slander Trump and his associates.”

In the past, the former Republican president has denounced James’ investigation as part of a “witch hunt” as well as a parallel criminal investigation by the Manhattan district attorney’s office.

James investigators last year interviewed one of Trump’s sons, Eric Trump, an executive with the Trump Organization, as part of the investigation. James’s office went to court to enforce a subpoena against young Trump, and a judge forced him to testify after his lawyers abruptly quashed a previously scheduled deposition.

New York State Attorney General Letitia James speaks at a press conference in New York in August 2021. (Ted Shaffrey / The Associated Press)

Former District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. last year gained access to the longtime real estate mogul’s tax records after a years-long fight that twice went to the State Supreme Court -United. He also brought tax evasion charges in July against the Trump Organization and its longtime CFO Allen Weisselberg.

Although the civil investigation is separate from the District Attorney’s criminal investigation, James’ office was involved in both.

Former Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr. is shown in May 2018. (Frank Franklin II / The Associated Press)

Before stepping down last week, Vance called a new grand jury to hear evidence as he weighed whether he should seek further indictments as part of the investigation.

Weisselberg has pleaded not guilty to the charges alleging that he and the company evaded taxes on lucrative employee benefits paid to executives.

Both investigations are at least in part linked to allegations made in news reports and by former Trump personal attorney Michael Cohen that Trump had a habit of distorting asset values.

James’ office issued subpoenas to local governments as part of the civil investigation into the cases involving Seven Springs, Trump’s estate in upper Manhattan, and a tax benefit Trump received for placing land in a conservation trust. Vance subsequently issued subpoenas requesting many of the same files.

James’ office also looked at similar issues with a Trump office building in New York City, a hotel in Chicago, and a golf course near Los Angeles.

His office has also won a series of court rulings forcing Trump’s company and a law firm it hired to hand over treasure troves of documents.


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